Amelia Whitehart July 28, 2019

A small history of watches and several advices for purchasing the perfect watch. Autavia Isograph, 42mm brushed and polished stainless steel case, dark brown calfskin strap. The Autavia has made brief appearances in Tag Heuer’s collection since it was officially discontinued in 1985, making more headlines as a collector curio than a novelty. The welcome return this year of the watch whose name is a portmanteau of “automotive” and “aviation” comes with the promise of lots of options, including a bronze-cased version, and a high-performance movement. The secret here is in the “Isograph” delineation, which points to the advanced engineering of the movement’s most delicate and important part: its hairspring. The Autavia’s is new and engineered from carbon-composite, a material that brings the benefits of anti-magnetism, resistance to gravity and shocks, and increased precision. In practice, that should make for a more reliable, more durable, and better watch.

Let’s move on to the under 1000 USD category. While the circa $10 Casio F91W-1 probably also deserves a place on a list like this, we’ll begin with the awesome World Time just to avoid Casio-overload. But the Japanese brand is undeniably strong in this price point with tough, reliable, dirt-cheap watches. Oh, and some people find them to be quite stylish as well. This Casio World Time offers all these attributes and more (including world time, calendar, and alarms) with a dash of retro-futuristic nostalgia, and it’s surprisingly robust for such a great price. Using an automatic movement based on an old caliber originally from Seiko, the Orient 3 Star is a simple, utilitarian automatic akin to the Seiko 5. While there’s not much in the way of fit and finish, it does have a well-proportioned 37.5mm case, a stainless steel bracelet and a colorful dial. Its as simple of an automatic watch that you can get, but therein lies its charm.

Based in Saint-Imier, Switzerland, Longines was founded in 1832 and its winged hourglass logo is the oldest registered trademark of any watch brand. The HydroConquest is as serious a diving watch as it sounds, water resistant to 1,000 feet, making it a reliable companion underwater. The steel band gives it heft and durability, and overall it’s designed to be the perfect combination of style and technical innovation complete with an automatic movement. No distinguished gentleman should be without a Movado watch. What other way to showcase your sub-luxury wealth and style than with this timeless chronograph model, which draws inspiration from the brand’s fashion-forward ‘50s collection? The Calendoplan is masterfully designed, from the luminous hands and markers to the black, blue, and gold colorway, which is eye-catching yet neutral enough to pair with most outfits.

WatchNerd is your go-to virtual “watch guy.” He has all the latest information about the best luxury watches and will give you his honest opinion without any gimmicks. He has nothing to win or lose from you buying any particular watch, and is only interested in helping you find a watch that you love. He’s always been a super smart guy, and only makes a decision or offers advice when he’s confident he has 110% of the necessary information. However, he also genuinely cares about the advice he gives and wants to make sure he’s helpful — never overbearing or pushy. He gets his information from a wide range of sources, staying on top of the latest trends but also relying on hard numbers. He knows there’s a lot of crappy advice out there, and always triple checks his informative before giving his opinion. Read extra details on Watch Enthusiasts Blog.